Category Archives: Psychology

Sun (In)Justice Strikes Again

A recent article in The Sun has once again raised concerns about the ways in which the newspaper discusses issues relating to sexual crime. The piece concerns non-offending paedophiles on Twitter, who openly self-identify as being sexually interested in children, and their alleged activities. While the type of presentation in the article is objectively harmful… Read More »

Ideological Disgust and Authoritarianism

(This article represents an initial laying-out of some thoughts I’m having about an emerging research interest. If you have comments or suggestions to make about this line of work, or if you are a psychologist interested in collaborating on this type of project, please do get in touch).   We are living in times of… Read More »

ISPP 2017 – My Thoughts on Day 1

I’m currently in Edinburgh for the conference of the International Society of Political Psychology (ISPP 2017) – the annual convention where the great and the good of political psychological research gather to share their latest research findings. While I’m waiting for my talk on Sunday morning (for delegates – 8:30am in the Playfair Reception Room), I… Read More »

The Dogmatic Side of “Classical Liberalism”

This past Tuesday saw what was supposed to be an interview of former EDL leader Tommy Robinson take place on the breakfast TV show, Good Morning Britain (GMB). During the segment, host Piers Morgan and Tommy Robinson between them demonstrated everything that is wrong with how we deal with the problem of Islamist extremism. However, arguably… Read More »

Evidence for Collective Munchausen Syndrome?

There was a paper recently published in the journal Psychological Science, which I think scientifically demonstrates an issue that we’re currently witnessing in society in terms of a widespread complex of victimhood.

Introducing Moral Foundations Theory

Psychologists (and wider society) are becoming increasingly aware that we make political decisions using intuitions – non-conscious gut feelings – rather than through rational debate and consideration of evidence. In this post, I want to outline one influential theory that helps us to explain how and why we do this: moral foundations theory.

A Concentric Model of “Fake News”

There’s been a lot of talk recently about so-called fake news. In this post, I want to explore what fake news is, what it isn’t, and what this phenomenon reveals about our psychology in relation to how we take in information from the media.